4 Key Considerations to Buying a Law Practice

Where to start? If you are considering buying an existing law practice or buying out a retiring partner in your own practice, here are some key items to consider:

 1. Make sure the practice is the right fit for you – Not just the practice areas, geographic location and financial needs, but review and consider:

-Are the clients going to be comfortable with you and are you comfortable with the clients?
-Are the revenues sustainable for how you would run the practice?
-Are you going to be happy coming into the office each day?
-What changes are required of the practice model, facility, and staff? Are you up for making those changes?

2. Do the financials work? – Have you had the practice valued by a qualified individual to make sure the cash flows and practice characteristics justify the purchase price?

 3. Are you being objective? – Keep focused on getting the deal that you want on the right practice for you. Maintain your professionalism and be ready if one or more of the potential purchases do not work out at first. Competing purchasers or due diligence items may work to terminate a deal and keeping emotion out of it will help you regroup and move onto the next practice that’s right for you.

4. Get help! – You are an expert in your field. Now it is time to swallow your pride and get experts in the practice acquisition field. A law practice broker, a law focused CPA and yes, even an attorney, are all needed to advise you and make sure things proceed as needed.

The Law Practice Exchange aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm.   Find out more at www.TheLawPracticeExchange.com. © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

The information and advice provided in this publication is general guidance and is not necessarily specific to your individual situation, objectives or other needs. Make sure you seek a qualified expert opinion before proceeding with your transition objectives.

LPE Approved As A BBP Industry Expert

 

The Law Practice Exchange, LLC is pleased to announce that we have been approaved as a BBP (Business Brokerage Press) Industry Expert for the industry of Law Practices/Legal! We will be included in the 2016 Business Reference Guide. This book is the “essential guide to pricing businesses with up-to-date rules of thumb and pricing information for almost 700 types of businesses.” We will also be added to the Industry Expert directory website.

Estate Planning for the Small Firm Partner or Solo Practitioner

 

Time to Plan!

Estate Planning for the Small Firm Partner or Solo Practitioner
The fundamental principal of estate planning is to anticipate and prepare for the major life events, particularly, what will happen to one’s property upon disability or death. The same train of thought can and should be applied to your law practice. Preparing and implementing a concrete backup plan should be a major priority for any practice owner.The reality of the situation is that so very often professionals spend most or all of their waking hours working on or in their practice. The seemingly endless needs of one’s clients tend to get in the way of this sort of planning. But it is too important to ignore. What were to happen, say, if the sole owner of a practice passed away without a succession plan in place? Trouble, definitely. Chaos, most likely. Missed opportunities, certainly.Every practice owner should take the time to adopt a plan for his or her practice that will properly provide for ongoing client management and representation upon his or her passing. Call it an emergency plan, a disaster plan, or otherwise, it should be well thought out and hands-on in the event of the practitioner’s passing. Here are some key elements to consider as part of that planning:

  1. Prepare. Prepare a law practice knowledge base with key disaster info and checklist for what steps should be taken in such an event.
  2. Ethics. Consider your ethical requirements for each event and how they may impact your plan.
  3. Personal Needs. What are your personal needs regarding exit value for you, your family or otherwise?
  4. Plan for Each Event. Review and implement a transition plan for:
    • Retirement
      • Are you going to sell your practice, close it down or transition it to a new associate?
      • Is time on your side to accomplish this planning?
      • Will the law practice purchase price meet your retirement planning needs?
    • Disability or Death
      • Do you have an Assumption Agreement with an outside trusted peer attorney or a Buy-Sell/Partnership Agreement with other partners of the firm?
      • How has the purchase price in these events been calculated and is it properly funded to ensure payment?
      • How can you prepare clients to ease transition in such an event?
    • Relocation or Other Transition
      • How would an accelerated timeline impact your plan?
      • Would your potential transitioning attorney be able to manage the increased client demand?
  1. Ask For Assistance. Seek out those who focus on practice transitions or these types of events and ask for advice in putting together your plan. There is an abundance of resources out there with your insurance providers, state bar associations. In addition, key individuals such as CPAs, financial advisors and law practice consultants and brokers can help you make quick work of your practice’s estate plan.

Just like the saying in estate planning goes; it is not a matter of ‘if’, but ‘when’ this same mindset should be used to motivate your planning. Whether you control the decision or not when retirement, disability or your passing occurs make sure you have a plan that takes care of your practice, your clients and preserves the value built for your loved ones.

One works tirelessly to build a successful practice and a plan should be in place regarding what would happen if the founder were to become disabled or pass away. One’s law practice succession plan and estate plan should work hand in hand to ensure that there is a smooth transition from leadership to leadership and your responsibilities and goals are met.

The Law Practice Exchange aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm.   Find out more at www.TheLawPracticeExchange.com. © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

The information and advice provided in this publication is general guidance and is not necessarily specific to your individual situation, objectives or other needs. Make sure you seek a qualified expert opinion before proceeding with your transition objectives.

Can You Really Buy or Sell a Law Practice?

 

Can You Really Buy or Sell a Law Practice?

Have you ever thought about your exit plan from your practice? Retirement, family demands, a new career, or some other career pursuit may be calling. But the typical question that holds many lawyers back from entering the next phase is, “how can I afford to live without the income and resources from my practice?” For many, there are retirement savings, alternative opportunities from a second career or other options available to replace practice income. However, few attorneys actually consider the option of selling their practice as the precursor to that next step or even know that doing so is an option. Selling a practice through a law practice transition can be a great way to benefit from the value built up over years of work. In addition, there are probably even fewer growth-focused attorneys who consider the potential of purchasing a practice as a way to grow client base, income and revenue streams, and overall firm health and sustainability.

The Reality Is That Every Lawyer At Some Point In Time Needs A Plan.

Thanks to life’s multitude of unexpected events, that time may be sooner than you think. And when you throw in the current state of evolution of the legal profession, it becomes more and more apparent just how important it is for each practicing professional to understand the challenges and opportunities that accompany this type of transition. For instance, do you have a succession plan? A practice continuation plan? If so, have you implemented such plan, put the tools in place or sought the counsel needed for implementation? If not, you’re not alone. Few lawyers, particularly, solos and small firm members, have a signed succession or practice continuation plan in place and many don’t think about it until too late to fully recoup the practice value.

With this state of flux in the legal world and the potential impact of major life events, the rules of law practice succession are still being rewritten. Gone are the days of whipping together a succession strategy, transitioning the clients to the next generation of lawyers, and sailing off into a retirement funded by the new partners at the firm. From big-firm shakeups to increasing client competition among small firms, lawyers today must contend with unprecedented financial, cultural, and marketplace changes and, as a result, each attorney must be open to transition strategies with a longer reach than those employed in the past. These broader and more modern strategies include realizing the value of a law practice through a sale or acquisition.

So, How Does One Go About Buying A Selling A Practice?

The knowledge of the process is somewhat complicated by the fact that law practice sales are nearly invisible to the public market. Look down the street and around town and you see house-for-sale signs everywhere. A quick web search yields any number of results detailing homes values and prices and identities of the parties involved. Established markets, like the residential real estate market, give the general public an excellent idea of how and for how much to buy and sell all sorts of items, including real estate, stock, and cars. Buying or selling a business (especially a law firm) is a different story; potential buyers and sellers need to work a bit harder to find and utilize the resources and opportunities available in the law practice marketplace.

Self-education is a good place to start. A potential buyer or seller typically doesn’t know whether any given attorney wants to exit his practice or buy someone else’s, what his practice looks like, what the process or the price to purchase or sell may be. Therefore it becomes important for any lawyer to put in some time, do some research, and learn the basics about the law practice marketplace, how it works, the resources available and how it may help a lawyer looking to transition or grow. Putting the right team of advisors in place is also an important step. The buying or selling of law practices isn’t new, but the approach and need to maximize the practice’s value through an active marketplace search and proper transition structure are setting new benchmarks for lawyer transition success stories.


The Law Practice Exchange aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm.   Find out more at www.TheLawPracticeExchange.com. © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

The information and advice provided in this publication is general guidance and is not necessarily specific to your individual situation, objectives or other needs. Make sure you seek a qualified expert opinion before proceeding with your transition objectives.

5 Things to Consider Before Buying a Law Practice

 

5 Things to Consider Before Buying a Law Practice

If you have been considering the benefits of buying a law practice in order to expand or grow your client base, be sure to ask yourself the following questions at the beginning of the process before going too far. Buying a law practice could be one of the biggest decisions an attorney makes in his or her career. As a result, it is crucial to prepare and make sure this potential purchase is right for you.

  1. IS NOW THE RIGHT TIME TO BUY? The first step should always be conducting an assessment of yourself and your firm when determining if you are ready to buy. A certain amount of confidence is needed in your strengths and the ability that you and your team can handle the transition and increased workload that will accompany the increased revenue stream. If you, the lawyer, and your law practice are ready, give some considerations to the personal aspects as well. Is this time right for you to take on more work, responsibility and risk? Or are there things in your personal life that should require such time?
  1. IS THE PRICE RIGHT? All law practices have value, but determining the exact amount of value is the real challenge. An analysis should be completed on the sale price and practice cash flows should be reviewed during the due diligence period to ensure the selling price is justified. Make sure someone who is knowledgeable in this area is providing this opinion and taking into account the key value-drivers of law practices.
  1. WILL THE SELLING FIRM’S CULTURE BE A GOOD FIT? If you don’t already know the attorney or practice, you will have the opportunity to get a glimpse of the firm’s culture throughout the due diligence period. Are there tenured employees or is there constant changeover? How much of the firm’s focus is on marketing for the future and getting clients as repeat customers? These and many other factors can help determine if it will be a good fit for you and your practice.
  1. IS THERE A DOCUMENTED TRANSITION PLAN? Whether the purchase you are considering is an internal transaction between attorneys of the same firm or an outside purchase, a documented and well thought out transition plan should be agreed on and a timeline should be specified. What transition goals should the exiting attorney focus on in the first few weeks? Next two years? Ultimately, you will want to know that you and the selling attorney agree on the goals of the transition, the time which will be required and the benchmarks of a successful plan as it is implemented.
  1. DO YOU HAVE ALL THE ANSWERS? You don’t. We promise you. Even though you are an attorney, this isn’t something you personally go through everyday. It is a process and having the right advisors from step one can ensure the transition is successful and missteps are avoided. Assemble your advisory team and connect with a qualified Law Practice Broker, your CPA and your Financial Advisor to help guide you through the process. Make sure these questions are asked and answered!
The Law Practice Exchange aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm.   Find out more at www.TheLawPracticeExchange.com. © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

The information and advice provided in this publication is general guidance and is not necessarily specific to your individual situation, objectives or other needs. Make sure you seek a qualified expert opinion before proceeding with your transition objectives.

‘I’m Thinking of a Number Between 1 and…’ What’s Your Law Practice’s Valuation Number?

 


As seen in Lawyers Mutual: Put Into Practice August 2015 Issue

Every Law Practice Has A Quantifiable And Marketable Value Of Its Own

My law practice has value? Seriously? Seriously. Like any other business, each law practice has a separate and marketable value of its own. You have built and managed a proven business model. The tasks that were difficult years ago when you started your practice are no longer obstacles, but instead they have been solved with the employees, processes, checklists, documented knowledge, software, solid client base and numerous other elements, that make up your daily operations. All of those resources have value to someone who doesn’t have to repeat those ‘fun’ exercises of experimenting with software, training employees and the like. However, the biggest impact on value that you and your law practice can offer is the ongoing and future access to contacts, referral sources and clients along with the trust and comfort they have with you, your team and your overall practice. In a nutshell, that business platform along with the expectation that the clients will keep coming and the referral sources will keep referring (with a little transition help from you) will produce your law practice’s value.

So, you have come to the understanding that your law practice has value, but next in line is the real question: How much? This number is the one that can make you feel good, feel proud and maybe even a little boastful or on the other hand this number may make you reconsider how things are structured and what you are really trying to build within your practice. Practice income now is great (and needed), but having an exit option that can fund your next career, your move to another state or your retirement is ultimately the decision of whether to sell or buy a practice.

Valuing Your Practice: What’s Your Magic Number?

A number of methods can be used to determine a law practice’s value. Each method may be right depending on needs or purpose of the valuation. Let’s start with some of the core methods and aspects used:

1.  Rule of Thumb Methods. The basic premise of these varying methods is to look at past cash flows in order to estimate future value. They are based on the belief that what has happened in the past should continue in the future (hopefully). Traditionally, the cash flow numbers that are examined are either Revenues or Net Income with the latter being applied in most professional and market valuations.

–  Revenues – Law practices will typically sell for a multiple of anywhere from .5 to 1.5 of average annual revenues. A practice with average annual revenues of $500,000 may, therefore, sell for anywhere from $250,000 to $600,000 (not a bad number if you previously hadn’t considered your practice had value, eh?). The big missing element on the revenues approach is that it doesn’t consider how well the firm is run or how much profit/net cash flow it leaves an owner.

–  Multiple of Net Income – Law practices will typically sell for a multiple of between 2 to 3 times net earnings. Using our example from above, if that same firm has net income of $200,000 then the value may be anywhere between $400,00 to $600,000. The concern with the net income approach alone is that it leaves out core adjustments and considerations unique to that practice that can have a tremendous impact on what a buyer would actually pay for the practice.

2.  Market Comparison. In a marketplace of buying and selling law practices where most negotiations and actual deals are confidential, the public’s knowledge or some database of closed transaction prices are limited to say the least. While confidentiality adds a layer of difficulty to the overall public valuation process, those with knowledge of the marketplace and what actual numbers law practices are transferring at can be phenomenal resources. CPAs, practice brokers, other lawyers, lenders and others who focus on the legal marketplace have unique knowledge based on their involvement in these types of transactions over the years.

The market approach simply compares your law practice characteristics (financials, practice area, geographic area, etc.) to other law practice sales that have recently closed to give an opinion of value. The belief is similar to the real estate market approach in that what one sold for down the street yesterday is approximately what yours would sell for today, provided they are similar enough in core features and financials.

3.  Key Value Drivers. Your law practice is unique and its individual characteristics need to be considered as part of your valuation. Some of them will help increase the value but some will also lower it. Determining where your practice stands on that spectrum can play a big part in value calculation. Some of the main factors that can create a large swing in value:

–  Financial Performance
–  Growth Potential
–  Brand Identity
–  Size of Practice
–  Repetitive Client Revenues and Fee Structures
–  Practice Structure and Owner Involvement
–  Client Satisfaction
–  Practice Area
–  Client Diversity
–  Geographic Location
–  Quality of Employees/Staff

4.  Adjustments. With any of the methods used for valuation there will always be adjustments that need to be made in addition to those from the key value drivers noted. These adjustments are typically ones that have made a financial impact on the practice, but for one reason or another would be added back or subtracted to come up with true earnings. That said, every valuation should include some adjustments.

The ‘It Depends’ Disclaimer

Hey, we are attorneys and thus understand that variables can change the rules and the end result. You and your practice are unique and those specific aspects can throw any of the methods above out the window or vary them quite a bit. However, you know your practice and if you truly want to know the value of what you have built, start with the above as a first step and then gather the right information and take the time to go through the valuation process with an expert who is fit to meet your valuation needs.

The Law Practice Exchange aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm.   Find out more at https://thelawpracticeexchange.com. © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

The information and advice provided in this publication is general guidance and is not necessarily specific to your individual situation, objectives or other needs. Make sure you seek a qualified expert opinion before proceeding with your transition objectives.

The Financials of a Law Practice Value Determination Explained


Many – not all, but many – deals turn on the purchase price. The rest can typically be worked out if the purchase price is agreed upon. Obtaining an accurate valuation of the practice, therefore, is one of the most important things you can do as a seller to help you actually sell the practice. In most cases, the valuation by a law practice broker will determine the purchase price. Additionally, having that valuation can help a selling attorney avoid issues presented by an emotional overvaluing of the practice, obtain the necessary financing, and find the right buyer.

From the buyer’s perspective, the valuation is important because it perhaps takes some of the “leap of faith” out of the deal. Buying a practice is a huge investment of, among other things, time, money, and emotional, mental and physical well-being. It could ultimately be a bust; the buyer just doesn’t know. But, if he or she knows the value of the practice, and can review those factors that went into reaching that valuation, he or she can rest a bit easier.

So what goes into determining the value of a practice? In a nutshell: goodwill. Goodwill is typically calculated though by a comprehensive look at the historical, current and projected financial outlook of the practice as well as other characteristics specific to that practice, practice areas, geographic area or client-base. Practically speaking, this means putting together the necessary documents and value indicators, identifying unique valuation factors, identifying issues and solutions to those issues, selecting valuation methodology and applying all of the above to that methodology.

Documents/Evidence of Value: Your practice broker or other valuation expert will provide you with a specific list of items. It will be a long list. Here are some items that will likely be on that list:

  • Annual financial statements and tax returns for last 5 years
  • W-2s/K-1s
  • Interim financial statements through last period
  • Copies of any forecasts or projections
  • Copies of business plan
  • Schedules of compensation for employees and seller
  • Appraisals and lists of specific hard assets
  • Specific Owner Benefits being paid for by practice
  • Reports of other consultants
  • Brochures, information, website, ads
  • Resumes or summary of background and experience
  • Client Fee Guidelines/Schedules
  • Engagement Agreements/Representation Letters
  • Breakout of revenue mix by percentage, including: Direct selling; Referral driven; Advertising; and Repeat clients
  • Total number of client matters over last 24 months
  • Details of significant leases, loans and notes
  • Copies of partnership agreements or associate agreements
  • Copies of any buy-sell agreements
  • Details of key employees employment contracts
  • Details of any litigation, including pending claims
  • Details on any employee benefit plans

 

Factors: There can be a massively long list of factors that are considered in any given practice valuation. But on a transaction-to-transaction basis, the most common are the following:

  • Recurring Revenue: What are the historical revenue, current revenue, and likelihood of revenue on an ongoing basis? This includes a detailed analysis of the clients of the firm, nature of legal representation and likelihood of repeat business.
  • Size of the Practice: Revenue; Number of Employees and Partners; Number of Clients; etc.
  • Assets to Liabilities: What are the debts and obligations of the practice? In relation to its assets?
  • Type of Practice: Practice area, particularly in relation to other similar practices in the geographical region and zone of service provision.
  • Location: Is it in a major metropolis? A rural area? What is the population of the area? Demographics?
  • Dependency of clients on attorney: This again goes back to repeat business.
  • Profitability: Historical and current review of the profits and margins of the practice. Is the practice’s overhead justified by its revenue?
  • Billing Rates & Realization: A detailed review of A/R and collections. Do the practice’s clients pay their bills?
  • Employees: Number, nature and skill.
  • Technology: Review and analysis of the technological infrastructure of the firm.
  • Age of Clients: This again goes back to repeat clients.
  • Concentration Mix of Fees: How diversified or, alternatively, concentrated is the nature of the fees charged and collected?
  • Terms of Sale: The specific deal terms can have a dramatic impact on valuation, including intended purchase price allocation.
  • Buyer type
  • Hard assets to be transferred (vehicles, computers, etc)
  • Fee Agreements or ongoing revenues guaranteed
  • Transition time

That is a long list of factors. And there can be several more. In summation, they can be boiled down to some key items, including net worth, current value, cash flow and projected future cash flow, and identifying those items that most drive the practice’s value, including:

  • Human capital and customer base, including the impact of diversification, AR, and relational health;
  • Product and service offerings, including the impact of market saturation/share, the existence and extent of continuous improvement; and
  • Repeatability of business.

It is also important to note that the legal field is based largely on relationships, which come and go. Market changes and factors, client transitions, real estate issues, employee retention and profitability, and other contract needs all have major impacts on the relationships of a practice, including those with its clients and referral sources. And they all have a material effect on the current and ongoing value of the practice. All practitioners should identify and incorporate specific steps to address, improve and protect relationships for the good of the practice and its value.

With all this knowledge of what information to gather and what factors may impact the most important step is applying the appropriate valuation methodology to the results of the above review and analysis. In the legal field, that often means identifying and applying a particular multiple of profit, with a typical baseline of a multiple of profit (2-3 times), or a percentage (50%-80%) of annual revenue. The results of each approach could be similar or significantly different, and which one that is used will depend on market factors, primarily including the negotiations between the buyer and seller.

 

 

 

The Law Practice Exchange, LLC aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm.  © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

Top 10 Practice Exit Planning Mistakes


If you are considering exiting your law practice in the next few years make sure to plan ahead and avoid these costly mistakes.

1. Failing to Consider All Your Options – Should you sell your practice internally? Have you considered an external sale? Is your Associate or junior partner ready to pay?

2. Not Getting Help – We are lawyers and we of course can do everything, but sometimes getting help from those who are experts is the right thing to do. Consider having an initial meeting with your financial advisor, CPA and of course, your practice broker to walk through best options for you.

3. Being Too Reactive – If you wait till the market feels right or the practice is exactly at the right number you may miss the best opportunities to transition. Just like you can’t time the stock market picking the exact right time to exit is not always achievable.

4. Not Understanding The Timeline – Selling a law practice is about transition and preparing, finding and implementing the best exit option takes time even before that transition begins. The more time you give the process the better the value and the outcome.

5. Failing to Consider Your Financial Needs – Don’t forget that your personal financial or retirement plan are dependent on the cash flow or exit value from your law practice. Make sure you have a clear understanding of what amounts you need for your personal plan post-exit.

6. Not Knowing Your Value – What is your practice worth now? Make sure you have done your own due diligence and have a complete understanding of a realistic and defendable value for your practice.

7. Getting Distracted – We are emergency responders for our clients and some days there are just too many client fires to handle to allow you to also continue the plan for your exit. See (2) above and consider getting someone in place to make sure the planning continues when you aren’t able to.

8. Not Considering the Taxes, Taxes, Taxes – Review any exit options or potential deals with your CPA and make sure taxes are calculated and determined to predict your true net number.

9. Making it Too Complicated – Exiting your law practice does not have to be complicated. Don’t get overwhelmed with the tasks ahead. If you have chosen an experienced team they will walk you through the steps and get you to the finish line.

10. Forgetting What Is Next – If you are successful in exiting your practice make sure you have a plan for post-transition. This profession has been your life for many years and now it is onto the next stage. Have a personal plan and be ready to implement.

 

 

The Law Practice Exchange, LLC aims to curb the lack of knowledge in the profession on law practice transitions by educating and advising attorneys on the number of different options available in the legal marketplace and also serving as a confidential broker and advisor to seek and provide connections for those right opportunities between an exiting attorney and a growth-focused attorney or firm. © 2015 The Law Practice Exchange, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

What Our Clients Say !

“The transition was smooth, the clients were glad to know their new advocate was enthusiastic and ready to help them and the practice never skipped a beat.”

Erik B.- Buyer

2019-01-02T01:16:03+00:00

Erik B.- Buyer

“The transition was smooth, the clients were glad to know their new advocate was enthusiastic and ready to help them and the practice never skipped a beat.”
“Amanda and Tom introduced me to a buyer I would have never met otherwise.  Throughout the process, they were available, helpful, and experienced in keeping us on track toward closing.  The entire process went better than expected, and I have Amanda and Tom to thank for that.”

-Bankruptcy Firm Seller LPE#541

2019-01-02T01:27:54+00:00

-Bankruptcy Firm Seller LPE#541

“Amanda and Tom introduced me to a buyer I would have never met otherwise.  Throughout the process, they were available, helpful, and experienced in keeping us on track toward closing.  The entire process went better than expected, and I have Amanda and Tom to thank for that.”
“Thank you again for all of your help. I didn’t think it was possible to get money for our practice and you proved me wrong.”

-Residential Real Estate Seller LPE#522

2019-01-02T01:25:47+00:00

-Residential Real Estate Seller LPE#522

“Thank you again for all of your help. I didn’t think it was possible to get money for our practice and you proved me wrong.”
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